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RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014
       
     
       
     
Luminarium
       
     
Eidos
       
     
Eidos (detail)
       
     
Eidos
       
     
Eidos
       
     
Sketch London
       
     
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Money Laundering
       
     
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Goblet
       
     
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seX–fiction
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“This is a utopian space where the distinction between animate and inanimate is perverted.
Objects abandon their passiveness reproducing through sexual intercourse and by doing so liberate themselves from thousands of years of unwanted dependence”.

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Prompting comparison with Calder and Brancusi, but raunchier than either, Diego Fortunato is the unchallenged master of the eroto-protoplasmic. Breathtaking in their primal simplicity, his objects define a brave new world of seX–fictional play.

‘Hot or not?’ isn’t a question much asked in the field of contemporary art appraisal. And yet it is one forced on us by Diego Fortunato, whose protoplasmic and agendered forms are at once glacial in their detachment, and sizzlingly insistent in their tension. We are conscious, always, of imminent insertion, of enclosure, of ‘docking procedures’.
Globular and lubricious – immobile mobiles, if you will - his protoplasmic forms constantly threaten, but never actually effect, sexual anschluss (1).
 
The suggestive has been a force in art since long before Michaelangelo chiselled the dimples on David’s buttocks. But the potency of Fortunato’s forms resides less in their quasi-physicality than in their ludic directional flow. They are unpersönlich (2). They do not come on strong. But we see, in their latency, the possibility of a serene new post-pornographic innocence. A state Gwynneth Paltrow, echoing Lacan, has defined as “the next level of conscience”.

Text curated by Dr Nicholas Tate

(1) connection
(2) aloof

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Undisclosed Case IV |  Stainless steel |  40 x 19 x 58 cm.

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L’Origine du monde |  Calacatta Delicato marble 44 x 20 x 50 cm.

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Undisclosed Case V |  Calacatta Delicato and Nero Marquina marble |  30 x 20 x 180 cm. height

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Undisclosed Case VI |  Laquered iron | 25 x 25 cm
Undisclosed Case VII |  Stainless steel or Laquered iron | 15 x 15 cm.

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Big Undisclosed Cases I, II & III |  Stainless steel 280 cm. height

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Undisclosed Cases I, II & III  Stainless steel |  220 cm. height
L’Origine du monde  |  Stainless steel |  89 x 230 cm. height

 

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L’Origine du monde |  Stainless steel |  89 x 55 x 230 cm. height | YIA Paris Exhibition | October 2015

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RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014

There are numerous weird and wonderful gardens on display at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show however, one that really resonated with the Buenos Aires-born artist and product designer was the Sensory Garden sponsored by pioneering Marlborough winery Cloudy Bay and designed by the award-winning Wilson McWilliam Studio.

Having studied fine art and industrial design, and after producing designs for studios in Spain, Italy and the UK, in 2012, Diego Fortunato returned to his first love of fine art. He initially worked with Lapicida creating a range of highly successful stone wall panelling. Fascinated by Lapicida’s CNC shaping mills’ capabilities in carving intricate and complex sculpture from natural stone, Diego conceived an idea that really gripped Lapicida’s imagination.

His concept was a sculpture entitled ‘Luminarium’ which means ‘light’ or ‘lamp’ in Latin. By recording his spoken word of “light” he created a unique soundwave with an elegantly fluctuating waveform. The Lapicida technical design team then changed the waveform from horizontal to vertical and set to work modeling it into a 3D computer generated wireframe model.

Once Diego was happy with every minute detail, a single block of fine Italian Carrara Marble was carefully selected and Europe’s largest CNC shaping mill – a Breton NC1600 – set to work painstakingly sculpting the two distinctive waveforms of Luminarium using its 5-axis diamond tipped cutter. Lapicida artisan craftsmen then hand-finished the pair using their considerable experience.

The result is a highly arresting yet elegant work of art that is sure to be appreciated in the Cloudy Bay Sensory Garden – a garden designed to be gently immersive. It’s an environment that’s been specially designed to unite layered structures, textures, spaces, scents, visual structures and sounds. Huge congratulations go to the Wilson McWilliam Studio as their sensory garden won a Silver Gilt Medal from judges.

       
     
BBC video depicting Luminarium statue at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014
Luminarium
       
     
Luminarium

More often then not, our perception of form stems from assumptions that are shaped through physical and emotional layers. Exploring the essence of form and how it manifests itself is the basis of the van der Neige project.
Sound wave patterns derived from spoken words or sounds are recorded, and then subsequently translated into forms.
They are like coded motivations or contemplations through which the final forms take on a separate life from their coded inception; but still contain their original mystery, their journey through multiple layered languages.

Luminarium  |  Carrara marble |  190 cm. height | Manufactured by Lapicida UK

 

Eidos
       
     
Eidos

More often then not, our perception of form stems from assumptions that are shaped through physical and emotional layers. Exploring the essence of form and how it manifests itself is the basis of the van der Neige project.
Sound wave patterns derived from spoken words or sounds are recorded, and then subsequently translated into forms.
They are like coded motivations or contemplations through which the final forms take on a separate life from their coded inception; but still contain their original mystery, their journey through multiple layered languages.

Eidos  |  Carrara marble |  120 cm. diameter | Manufactured by Lapicida UK

Eidos (detail)
       
     
Eidos (detail)

More often then not, our perception of form stems from assumptions that are shaped through physical and emotional layers. Exploring the essence of form and how it manifests itself is the basis of the van der Neige project.
Sound wave patterns derived from spoken words or sounds are recorded, and then subsequently translated into forms.
They are like coded motivations or contemplations through which the final forms take on a separate life from their coded inception; but still contain their original mystery, their journey through multiple layered languages.

Eidos  |  Carrara marble |  120 cm. diameter | Manufactured by Lapicida UK

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Eidos   |  sub surface laser engraved glass   |  70 x 30 x 30 mm.   2015

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Eidos   |  sub surface laser engraved glass   |  70 x 30 x 30 mm.   2015

Sketch London
       
     
Sketch London

Diego’s early drawings (aged 4)  were preserved by his father and
became an art installation a zillion years later |  London, 2014

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Sketch London
       
     
Sketch London

Diego’s early drawings (aged 4)  were preserved by his father and
became an art installation a zillion years later |  London, 2014

Sketch London
       
     
Sketch London

Diego’s early drawings (aged 4)  were preserved by his father and
became an art installation a zillion years later |  London, 2014

Sketch London
       
     
Sketch London

Diego’s early drawings (aged 4)  were preserved by his father and
became an art installation a zillion years later |  London, 2014

Money Laundering
       
     
Money Laundering

Money Laundering installation | C. Decor |  Barcelona, 2010

Money Laundering
       
     
Money Laundering

Money Laundering installation | C. Decor |  Barcelona, 2010

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Money Laundering

Money Laundering installation | C. Decor |  Barcelona, 2010

       
     
HIDROLICA
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Goblet

Diego Fortunato gave form to the clay only by squeezing it with his hands and discovered many years later a direct connection with ancient Japanese ceramics made by the Jōmon people–  a culture which produced some of the oldest pottery in the world.

Diego Fortunato | Goblet | Irrational Ceramics exhibition |  Dialogica Gallery |  New York, 1992

Earthenware flame pot. Japan, c. 3000 BC. Nagaoka Municipal Science Museum | Niigata Prefecture, Japan.

 

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By request |  Calacatta Delicato and Nero Marquina marble

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By request |  Calacatta Delicato and Nero Marquina marble